February 27, 2018

Have you lost a tooth due to an accident or as a result of periodontal disease? Then you may need a dental implant. Before you go running out and getting any artificial tooth, you should know the differences in material. To be specific, there are two types of implants, Zirconium and titanium. Either option is an excellent step in the direction of improving overall oral health, but knowing the difference between the two is still important.

Zirconium Dental Implants

Zirconium Implants are as metal-free as your natural teeth and are considered a ceramic. Like most ceramics we encounter though, they contain metal atoms. Now as contradictory as that might be, it’s true. Just because there are metal atoms in zirconium does not mean that they are a metal implant. As the saying goes, not everything that glitters is gold, is same that anything that contains metal, is metal. These implants are considered entirely ceramic, but this type of ceramic is a combination of biocompatible aspects of ceramics and making it in some ways stronger than titanium. Currently, most FDA approved zirconia implants are created as one whole piece. Meaning that the root of the synthetic tooth and the abutment are attached to one another.

Titanium Dental Implants

Metal implants, also known as titanium implants, have been around since the 1960s, much longer than their zirconium counterparts. To give a little background, titanium is a metal that is durable, lightweight, non-toxic and corrosion resistant. They also have a 95 percent success rate in patients, and most patients with titanium implants will have them for 30 plus years. Alternately, since zirconium implants have not been around as long as titanium, we do not know their long-term success.  This versatility also provides the dentist with more control over the whole implant process.

There you have it the difference between Zirconium and metal implants. But before you go, know that with either option your mouth will need some time to heal fully. While your mouth is healing, your dental implants will form a strong and powerful bond with your gum tissue. The great news about both options is that they are biocompatible, meaning each offer a high acceptance rate with the body creating an environment for Osseointegration. Osseointegration means the bone can grow around the implant material.

At Smiles By Hanna, we know that any procedure with a dentist can be intimidating, which is why we take the time before to explain what you should expect before, during, and after the implant process. Now that you know the difference, you can schedule an appointment to speak with your dentist and discuss which option is best for you.